Last Chance to See Two Trashtastic Art Shows

Ruby Re-Usable sitting next to her plastic bag and tape sculpture, Mother and Child/Plastic Is Not Healthy for Babies and Other Living Things

There are two excellent group exhibits here in the Pacific Northwest that showcase art from recycled materials, and both are ending soon:

Saving the Environment: Sustainable Art exhibit at the Schack Art Center in Everett (April 23 – May 30, 2015) is an ambitious group show that spans a wide range of ways that artists work with recycled materials.

Ruby Re-Usable sitting next to her plastic bag and tape sculpture, Mother and Child/Plastic Is Not Healthy for Babies and Other Living Things

artist Ruby Re-Usable sitting next to her plastic bag and tape sculpture entitled “Mother and Child/Plastic Is Not Healthy for Babies and Other Living Things” in Saving the Environment: Sustainable Art at Schack Art Center

The list of participating artists includes lots of our favorite artist who work with recycled materials: Staci Adman, Sarah Allen, Dona Anderson, Jules Anslow, Jim Arrabito, Ross Palmer Beecher, Aline Bloch, Mary Ellen Bowers, Eric Brown, Susan Brendon, Jody Cain, Alana Coleman, Barbara De Pirro, Lynn DiNino, Marita Dingus, Amy Duncan, Claire Farabee, Roxy Gesler, Stuart Gullstrand, Julia Haack, Karen Hackenberg, Terra Holcomb, Katherine Holzknecht, Jan Hopkins, Susie Howell, Wendy Huhn, Peggy Hunt, Gay Jensen, Gale Johansen, Kristol Jones, Diane Kurzyna aka Ruby Re-Usable, Alice Larson, Stephen Lestat, Lucy Mae Martin, Danny Mangold, Lin McJunkin, Russ Morgan, Randy Morris, Thor Myhre, Keith Pace, Evan Peterson, Stan Price, Rainere Rainere, Lisa Rhoades, Joe Rossanno, Graham Schodda, Britni Jade Smith, Victoria & Ron Smith, Denise Snyder, Christine Stoll, Pat Tassoni, Joe Walker, Sylvia White, Laurie Williams, Heather Wilson, Tonnie Wolfe, Monica Ann Guerrero Yocom, and more

More pics HERE

Also check out this installation by Barbara De Pirro and Joe Walker at the show:

The other show that is happening right now is Cut & Bent: Group Exhibition at Bainbridge Island Museum of Art, an awesome tin/metal art group show with Ross Palmer BeecherJenny FilliusNia MichaelsDeborah PaulKathy RossLoran Scruggs, and Nan Wonderly — ends June 7, 2015.

artist Jenny Fillius in Cut and Bent at BIMA

artist Jenny Fillius in Cut and Bent at BIMA

Jenny Fillius with BIMA’s curator Greg Robinson podcast

More pics HERE

Upcycled Style Trash Fashion Show at the Schack Art Center

Lana Landfill, Ruby Re-Usable, Lova Landfill, and  Lena Landfill

Lana is wearing "Go-go Organic," Lova is in "Plastic Bag Blues," and Lena is modeling "Six-pack Princess," all designed by Ruby

We promised you pics from the Upcycled Style Trash Fashion Show at the Schack Art Center in Everett, WA, and we intend to keep our promise!

Nancy Judd of Recycle Runway with Ruby Re-Usable of Olympia Dumpster Divers

Nancy Judd with Ruby Re-Usable
Nancy is wearing her “Caution Dress,” made from caution tape, along with a “Throw Caution to the Wind” fascinator by Ruby Re-Usable; Ruby is wearing her “Once Is Not Enough” dress, which is made from a Mason County recycling sack & a thrift store frock, plus a plastic bag flower fascinator and pop top jewelry by Ruby.

As guest curator/co-producer, Ruby Re-Usable had her hands full and therefore does not have many photos of her own (but lots of learning experiences/stories she could tell …).  However, there were folks on hand to document this trashtastic event:

You can view every outfit from the show on Ruby’s Upcycled Style Trash Fashion Show Pinterest board, which features a selection of the fabulous photos from Josh+Rosemary Photography.  There is also a marvelous set of pics by Annie Mulligan/Everett Herald

Lana Landfill, Ruby Re-Usable, Lova Landfill, and  Lena Landfill Lana is wearing "Go-go Organic," Lova is in "Plastic Bag Blues," and Lena is modeling "Six-pack Princess," all designed by Ruby

Lana Landfill, Ruby Re-Usable, Lova Landfill, and Lena Landfill
Lana is wearing “Go-go Organic,” Lova is in “Plastic Bag Blues,” and Lena is modeling “Six-pack Princess,” all designed by Ruby Re-Usable

Monica Today posted this video of Six-pack Princess, designed by Ruby Re-Usable in true recycle/reuse style: it is a revised version of the original Six-pack Princess that Trashie Cassie wore last year.  The dress was created out of discarded blue packaging paper from ACT Theater, six-pack rings from various friends and family, and unused/unwanted mylar cookie packaging that was originally donated to the Museum of Glass art studio.  The jewelry is made from cat food can pull rings and soda pop tops.  Watch Lena Landfill, our spokesmodel for a greener world, sashay down the runway:

More short vids from Monica Today of the Upcycled Style Trash Fashion Show at the Schack Art Center HERE

Kudos to the Upcycled Style Trash Fashion designers: Kitty Center, Lynn Di Nino, Marita Dingus, Selena Eon of Rock Eon, Jane Grafton aka Tinker’s Dam, Monica Ann Guerrero Yocom aka Monica Today, Terra Holcomb, Susie Howell, Nancy Judd of Recycle Runway, Kristie Maxim aka Elle Poubelle, Rebecca Maxim aka Alotta DeTritus, Ruby Re-Usable, Loran Scruggs, Britni Jade Smith, and Robin Worley aka Rayona Visqueen.

Thank-you to all of the marvelous models: Robyn Lang, Leska Ratliff, Rosemary Jones, Marissa Motto, Megan Mullan, Jules Anslow, Russ Morgan, Stuart Gullstrand, Steve Jensen, Elinor Paulus, Lorelei Paulus, LisaLou Gogal, Heather Reiki, Allison Grable, Jana Rekosh, Kristen Humphries, Kahley Mae Estenson-Montez, Beth Dodrill, Abby Storwick, Joss van der Put, Raniere, and Christy Smith.  Thanks to Kallipso Rose for doing make-up, Steven Lough and Nancy Judd for being MCs, and to Jill King for doing flamenco dance during intermission.  And thank-you to the staff and volunteers of the Schack Art Center for hosting this event, especially gallery director Carie Collver!

 

Upcycled Style in Everett

The Mussel Gatherer by Terra Holcomb, now at the Schack Art Center in Everett

Tomorrow, May 2, is the Upcycled Style Trash Fashion Show at the Schack Art Center in Everett, Washington.

The Mussel Gatherer by Terra Holcomb, now at the Schack Art Center in Everett

The Mussel Gatherer by Terra Holcomb

Ruby Re-Usable is the guest curator; she will be joined by our trashionable friends Kitty Center, Lynn Di Nino, Marita Dingus, Selena Eon, Jane Grafton, Monica Ann Guerrero Yocom, Terra Holcomb, Susie Howell, Nancy Judd, Kristie Maxim, Rebecca Maxim, Loran Scruggs, Britni Jade Smith, Robin Worley, Lana Landfill, Lena Landfill, Lova Landfill, and more.  This event takes place in the gallery where the Saving the Environment: Sustainable Art exhibit is currently on display.  More pics next week!

“The Girls” by Marita Dingus

Marita Dingus at Traver Gallery 2015
NIGERIAN GIRLS, edition of 100 (detail)

The Girls Marita Dingus at Traver Gallery 2015

Marita Dingus‘ latest art exhibit, The Girls, is at Traver Gallery until March 28.  Marita continues her fearless exploration of recycled materials in this fierce display of female figures of the African Diaspora that range in size from 6 1/2 inches to 6 1/2 feet tall.

Marita Dingus at Traver Gallery 2015 NIGERIAN GIRLS, edition of 100 (detail)

Marita Dingus at Traver Gallery 2015
NIGERIAN GIRLS, edition of 100 (detail)

It is always intriguing to discover what discards she has incorporated into her pieces, especially when she points out “look what I did with those green plastic things you gave me,” because I, along with most of her friends and fans, contribute to her collection of interesting junk supplies.  In this case, the Olympia Library had given me a big box of empty spools from receipt paper; after ten years, I finally decided that I wasn’t going to use them in my work and passed them on to Marita, who always seems to find something to do with the stuff everyone else wants to throw away.

Marita Dingus with "Big Sister" at Traver Gallery 2015

Marita Dingus with “Big Sister” at Traver Gallery 2015

More pics of The Girls — Marita Dingus art exhibit at Traver Gallery HERE and HERE and HERE

 

Art from Rubbish by Michelle Reader

Fox recycled art sculpture by Michele Reader
Fox recycled art sculpture by Michele Reader

Fox recycled art sculpture by Michelle Reader

Since 1997, Michelle Reader has been working to make recycled materials into sculptures, often incorporating mechanical elements such as the working parts of toys and clocks. Her materials come from city dumps, roadsides, and thrift shops, and include both household and industrial waste. “I love the unpredictability of found materials and enjoy the inventiveness necessary to transform them into a sculpture,” she says. “I try wherever possible to use materials that are reclaimed, things with a history that have been discarded and might otherwise end up in landfill.”

Seven Wasted Men recycled art sculpture by Michele Reader

Seven Wasted Men recycled art sculpture by Michelle Reader

Perhaps her most famous work is this family portrait, known as “Seven Wasted Men,” that was made from one month of household waste from the family. “The materials not only highlight a need to address the amount of waste each of us produces, but also tells the story of each individual through the things they discard—a child’s drawings, a shopping list, a birthday card,” she says. via Jill Harness/mental_floss

Upcycle Style: Fashionable Fife

Upcycle Style trashionistas backstage

The Diva of the Olympia Dumpster Divers, Ruby Re-Usable, and Darcy Anderson (Team Tinkertopia in Tacoma) presented a trash fashion show on 9/13/14, as part of the Valley Ballyhoo Performing Arts Show in Fife, WA.  This was a first time collaboration between Ms Re-Usable and Ms Darcy, but as Ruby (and Jacqueline Susann) likes to say, “Once Is Not Enough,” so we look forward to more of these events in the South Puget Sound region (and beyond) in the future!

Ruby wearing a bag from Mason County recycling that reads "Once Is Not Enough"

Ruby Re-Usable is wearing a bag from Shelton/Mason County Recycling that once held recyclables

Ruby was introduced to Trash Fashion through Robin Worley/Rayona Visqueen of Haute Trash; she has since participated as a designer in trash fashion shows such as Trash Fashion Futures, Icicle Arts Trash to Fash Runway & Awards Show, Trashion at the Indiana Welcome Center, and the Seattle RE Store’s 10th Trash Fashion Show, among others.  She really wanted to work with Ms Darcy after seeing her as a “Daffodil Princess” in the window of Tinkertopia (where she is co-proprietress), so when the Fife Arts Commission asked Ruby to participate in the Valley Ballyhoo, she invited Darcy to join her, and a Trashionista was born!  Darcy got her talented Tacoma friends to work with her on Team Tinkertopia, thus inspiring even more creative folks to discover their inner trashion designer.

Ms Darcy as a Daffodil Princess in the window of Tinkertopia

Ms Darcy as a Daffodil Princess in the window of Tinkertopia, wearing brown paper packaging trimmed with yellow plastic lids and yellow duct tape

Trash Fashion is meant to be an “edutainment” event, combining information about recycling and other environmental issues with art and humor to create a show that is both entertaining and educational.  We also aim to be inclusive and body-positive, utilizing our friends and local volunteers as models.  The Upcycle Style show in Fife was no exception: our models ranged in age from elementary school to fifty-something, and we wowed the crowd with some of our classic trash fashions, along with some exciting new creations.  This show was also a learning experience for Ruby … like, how the show must go on, even if the microphone and pedestal disappear right before you go on stage (yes, this happened), along with other stuff (don’t ask).  We regret that we did not have any professional photographers to document this show, but we do have some pics on Flickr HERE and a cell phone vid posted on YouTube HERE

Upcycle Style trashionistas backstage

some of the Upcycle Style trashionistas backstage

 

Summer Shows in Seattle

My Palette #2 by Ross Palmer Beecher, 2013
46 x 38 inches

Seattle has a lot of artists who work with recycled materials.  One of our all-time favorites,  Ross Palmer Beecher, has been making art out of recycled materials since 1980, yet she continues to inspire us with her ingenuity, craftsmanship, and wit.  Her ability to find new ways to reuse stuff other folks throw away was on display this summer at Greg Kucera Gallery.

My Palette by Ross Palmer Beecher, 2009  23 x 16 x 2 inches

My Palette by Ross Palmer Beecher, 2009
23 x 16 x 2 inches

Two of our new favorite pieces from this recent show are “My Palette,” made out of tins, paint brushes, paint tubes, and enamel paint, and “My Palette #2.” The former takes the traditional shape of an artist palette and incorporates the traditional paints and brushes in a fresh, recycled-artist-kind-of-way, creating a sampler of some of her techniques and materials. “My Palette #2″ is made out of spray cans, paint tubes, and foil, arranged in a traditional multi-pieced star quilt pattern.  It is this juxtaposition of the traditional images and the non-traditional/unexpected materials that never fails to excite us.  More Ross Palmer Beecher HERE and HERE

My Palette #2 by Ross Palmer Beecher, 2013 46 x 38 inches

My Palette #2 by Ross Palmer Beecher, 2013
46 x 38 inches

Another fabulous Seattle artist that works with tin is our friend Jenny Fillius, who had a solo show at Gallery4Culture back in the beginning of June.  The Stranger described her work as “energetic, wall-mountable tin sculpture pieced together from salvaged metal pieces (toys, religious iconography, advertisements). It sometimes looks like it was made by a junkyard savant in a delirium.”  We regret to admit that we managed to miss seeing this show in person, but we can attest to the fact that Jenny knows what she is doing, and she does it with craftsmanship, intelligence, and humor.  See more Jenny Fillus HERE and HERE

Jenny Fillius Stay On the Sunny Side

Lastly, while we are posting about shows in Seattle that we are sad to have missed, we need to tell you about our friend and mentor Barbara De Pirro, whose work was in “Vorfreude” with Katie Miller at Method Gallery this summer.  Barbara’s current medium is reclaimed plastic bottles, which she transforms into elegant, organic shapes.

Vorfreude is a German word meaning “the joyful anticipation of future pleasures.”
“Vorfreude” explores the anticipation of growth, transformation, and renewal in life through the installations of Katie Miller and Barbara De Pirro … De Pirro examines renewal through using reclaimed materials. The resulting relationship between each installation is the process of transformation, exploring the expected potential of materials, their lifespan, and connection to their environments. The audience is linked with the exhibition as they observe its transformation and await the final event.

Metamorphosis by Barbara De Pirro at Method Gallery, 2014

Metamorphosis by Barbara De Pirro at Method Gallery, 2014

Our next chance to view Barbara De Pirro’s work will be September 5 – October 12, when it will be part of the group show “Ethnobotany: An Artists’ Study of Plants” at the Seymour Botanical Conservatory in Tacoma; this time, Olympia Dumpster Divers vow to be there!  More Barbara De Pirro HERE and HERE

Steve Jensen’s Art Boats

Viking Bot by Steve Jensen

Last Friday, Olympia Dumpster Divers attended the Percival Landing sculpture exhibit kick off party here in Olympia, WA.  It was a lovely little reception at the Harbor House, where chips and dips and non-alcoholic beverages were served and ballots passed out for the People’s Choice 2014 Percival Plinth Project.

Steve Jensen and Viking Bot at Percival Landing

Steve Jensen and Viking Bot at Percival Landing

Several of the thirteen pieces on display are made from recycled materials: Bil Fleming‘s “Basin of Quenched Fire” is a reclaimed sea buoy mounted on a tractor cog; in one of its previous reincarnations, it also served as a backyard fire pan.  Don Freas made “OPENING (Ring Dance #9)” out of a scrap length of heavy channel iron, some three inch and six inch pipe, a salvaged sprinkler pipe, and a cast-iron table base.  John Vanek used repurposed metal for “Dignity in Labor.”

But our vote for best sculpture (made out of recycled materials, of course) is Steve Jensen‘s “Viking Bot.”  We admire the elegant simplicity of repurposing railroad spikes (found by our mutual friend/fellow upcycle artist Russ Morgan while walking the tracks) into a vessel full of symbolism.  Steve, a Seattle native, comes from a long line of Norwegian fishermen and boat builders.  The image of the boat is meant to symbolize a voyage to the other side, or the journey into the unknown:

My best friend Sylvain did a drawing of a boat. When he gave it to me, he asked if I would make a carved boat for his ashes when he passed. He died a month later and I carved a boat as close to Sylvain’s drawing as possible. My mother came to Sylvain’s funeral and was so moved by the boat I had made for Sylvain that she wanted my father’s remains placed in a similar vessel when he passed. Since he was a Norwegian fisherman and boat builder, we buried the boat at sea, like a Viking funeral. Two years later when she passed, I created a boat for her and buried it at sea with my father. The day before John, my partner of twenty years, passed, he asked me to make a boat for his ashes. His wish was to be buried at sea with my parents. In the course of eight years I had tragically lost and buried everyone close to me.

Since that time I have created funeral boats for friends, family and pets. Art school never prepared me to work with human or animal ashes, but I feel honored to be asked and to have this opportunity. When I work with them, I feel transformed to another time or another place, an artist who has been asked to be both craftsman and mortician.

I began the Voyager Series to help me deal with my own grief and loss, and with hope to provide relief for others dealing with their own sorrow. I made this work as personal as possible because death is such a sensitive subject for many people. I felt that by exposing myself and my family, the viewers of this work might feel more at ease. Hopefully, for those who may be dealing with their own personal grief and loss, perhaps solace and insight can be found in this series.

I created the boats in this series approximately the same size as the actual boats used for burial. Carved in wood, painted, or sculpted, this work is a direct result of these experiences. Death is the one final thing we all have in common. The universal image of a boat in many cultures and civilizations symbolizes a voyage, perhaps the voyage to the “other side”, or the journey into the unknown.

You have until August 31 to vote for your favorite 2014 Peoples’ Choice Award Percival Landing Sculpture.  Read more in the 0lympian HERE             
 

Guerrilla Recycled Art in Olympia

Second-hand Sid sits with Guerrilla Man sculpture in the woods

Olympia Dumpster Divers first read about Guerrilla Man in The Weekly Volcano (Hanging with the Mysterious Artist Guerrilla Man) back in November 2013.

Guerrilla Man sculpture underneath I-5

Guerrilla Man sculpture underneath I-5

The Volcano named his work “Best Guerrilla Art” in Olympia 2014.  Then King 5 Evening News Magazine followed him into the woods and under the freeway to film him: view The Unknown Olympia Artist for more info.  

Second-hand Sid sits with Guerrilla Man sculpture in the woods

Second-hand Sid sits with Guerrilla Man sculpture in the woods

Second-hand Sid and Ruby Re-Usable finally figured out where these sculptures are (hint: they are in Tumwater, not Olympia).

Guerrilla Man writes that the sculptures underneath I-5 are “a revision and repurposing of the sculptural elements of a previous project.”  As far as we can tell, these figures have been there since September 2013.  The installations in the woods seem to have started around that time, too, using materials that were found on the site (plus some extra wire and nails).  Inspired by graffiti, Guerrilla Man’s unsanctioned art is worth searching for.  The experience of finding art in unusual/hidden/unauthorized places is part of the excitement of this kind of work.  See more pics HERE

More Marita Dingus at Northwest African American Museum

Marita at NWAM 2014-04-30 11.53.23
Teacups and friends photo by Spike Mafford

Teacups and Friends from Marita Dingus: At Home  photo by Spike Mafford

We went up to Seattle the other week with our friend and idol, the Queen of the recycled art scene, Marita Dingus, to see her latest exhibit at the Northwest African American Museum.  The exhibition, entitled Marita Dingus: At Home, includes the baskets, quilts, and dolls made from a myriad of recycled materials that were once formerly shown at Francine Seders Gallery, with photos by Spike Mafford of how these objects look in Marita’s home studio, where they are casually combined with her doll collection, outside in her goat pen, or being utilized to hold art supplies.  The show is up until May 26, 2014.  More Marita Dingus HERE and HERE and HERE, more pics of this show HERE

Marita at NWAM 2014-04-30 11.53.23